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US Immigration Law Archives

Will esports suffer because of US immigration law?

Esports are increasingly popular across not just the United States, but the entire world. Louisiana gamers are probably already familiar with the industry, which pits professional video game players against one another in large tournaments. Since esports is a global industry, there are serious considerations when looking at how U.S. immigration law may impact the future of tournaments held in America. 

How does US immigration law handle student visas?

Buying books, purchasing supplies and finding the perfect decorations for a dorm room are all part of the college experience, but international students have a bit more on their plate. Students from other countries who wish to study at a Louisiana university or educational institution must first acquire a nonimmigrant student visa. U.S. immigration law requires applicants to meet three criteria to qualify for these types of visas. 

Who can appeal a visa denial under US immigration law?

Applying for a visa is a lengthy process. The wait may feel worth it in the long run for those who successfully obtain their visas to come to Louisiana, but what about hopeful immigrants whose applications are denied? Appeals are an integral part of U.S. immigration law that can give people a second chance at coming to America. 

Will US immigration law permit my spouse to move here?

Getting married usually means selecting a venue, picking out outfits and planning a honeymoon. For some couples, though, the process is much more involved. Louisiana citizens who marry foreign spouses must apply for their partner to enter the United States legally with a green card. However, US immigration law is complicated, and couples must prepare to pass an interview with immigration authorities.

Is US immigration law too restrictive when it comes to workers?

Modern economists seem to agree on one thing -- immigration boosts the economy. This is in stark contrast to how most lawmakers view the matter, as many claim that they must place limits on employment immigration to prevent too many immigrants from filling positions that could otherwise go to U.S. citizens. However, a few key factors point make it clear why the current restrictive U.S. immigration law may not be the best thing for the Louisiana economy.

Administration: Domestic, gang violence don't justify asylum

"Asylum was never meant to alleviate all problems -- even all serious problems -- that people face every day all over the world," said Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a recent speech. He has personally ruled that immigration courts can no longer grant U.S. asylum based on an applicant's fear of personal violence by gangs or domestic partners.

Supreme Court's sports betting ruling could help sanctuary cities

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that Congress cannot force states to enforce federal law. Therefore, the majority of the court reasoned, Congress cannot forbid states from authorizing sports gambling within their borders. The power of states to legislate independent from federal government dictates was found to be covered by the 10th Amendment.

Asylum-seekers caravan arrives at border, faces barriers to entry

Immigrants can seek asylum in the U.S. if they have experienced, or if they have a reasonable fear of, persecution based on race, nationality, religion, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. It is entirely legal for people to seek asylum at any U.S. border crossing.

Supreme Court strikes down phrase in immigration law as vague

Courts have long held that, when a criminal law is too vague for a reasonable person to understand, it cannot be enforced. Enforcing it would violate our basic due process protections. The U.S. Supreme Court has just applied the same standard to the Immigration and Nationality Act's definition of a "crime of violence."

Federal judge: Funding can't be withheld from sanctuary areas

A federal judge in Los Angeles recently ruled that the U.S. Department of Justice will not be allowed to withhold grant funding from cities, counties and states that refuse to comply with federal immigration priorities. He issued a nationwide injunction striking down the effort.