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US Immigration Law Archives

Is US immigration law too restrictive when it comes to workers?

Modern economists seem to agree on one thing -- immigration boosts the economy. This is in stark contrast to how most lawmakers view the matter, as many claim that they must place limits on employment immigration to prevent too many immigrants from filling positions that could otherwise go to U.S. citizens. However, a few key factors point make it clear why the current restrictive U.S. immigration law may not be the best thing for the Louisiana economy.

Administration: Domestic, gang violence don't justify asylum

"Asylum was never meant to alleviate all problems -- even all serious problems -- that people face every day all over the world," said Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a recent speech. He has personally ruled that immigration courts can no longer grant U.S. asylum based on an applicant's fear of personal violence by gangs or domestic partners.

Supreme Court's sports betting ruling could help sanctuary cities

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that Congress cannot force states to enforce federal law. Therefore, the majority of the court reasoned, Congress cannot forbid states from authorizing sports gambling within their borders. The power of states to legislate independent from federal government dictates was found to be covered by the 10th Amendment.

Asylum-seekers caravan arrives at border, faces barriers to entry

Immigrants can seek asylum in the U.S. if they have experienced, or if they have a reasonable fear of, persecution based on race, nationality, religion, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. It is entirely legal for people to seek asylum at any U.S. border crossing.

Supreme Court strikes down phrase in immigration law as vague

Courts have long held that, when a criminal law is too vague for a reasonable person to understand, it cannot be enforced. Enforcing it would violate our basic due process protections. The U.S. Supreme Court has just applied the same standard to the Immigration and Nationality Act's definition of a "crime of violence."

Federal judge: Funding can't be withheld from sanctuary areas

A federal judge in Los Angeles recently ruled that the U.S. Department of Justice will not be allowed to withhold grant funding from cities, counties and states that refuse to comply with federal immigration priorities. He issued a nationwide injunction striking down the effort.

US may begin seeking detailed history from all visa applicants

The State Department recently announced a plan to require virtually all applicants for U.S. visas to provide more details as part of the vetting and approval process. Only certain official and diplomatic visa applicants would be exempt.

Supreme Court rejects challenge to DACA, orders continuation

The U.S. Supreme Court recently turned away an appeal by the state of Arizona, which had sought to end its participation in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. When the state attempted to deny program beneficiaries the driver's licenses they were entitled under DACA, the 9th Circuit struck Arizona's policy down. The Supreme Court left that ruling in place, requiring Arizona to issue the licenses.

DACA to continue, surprise Dreamer deportations ordered to stop

Two major court decisions involving the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program were announced this week. First, the U.S. Supreme Court put off an appeal of a federal court order. That order, a nationwide injunction, ordered the federal government not to shut down DACA on Monday, March 5, as had previously been announced. Second, another federal judge ordered all federal immigration enforcement authorities to stop revoking Dreamers' DACA protections or deporting them based on allegations of minor criminal activity.