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US Citizenship Archives

Getting citizenship takes time

The emotional journey of immigrating to the United States is unique to everyone, but most experience many similar frustrations. While this country is undoubtedly a melting pot of different cultures, ethnicities and religions from all over the world, the path to citizenship is daunting. On top of that, the process requires lots and lots of waiting. This can be frustrating for those who are waiting to make Louisiana their home.

US citizenship out of reach for some immigrant service members

There are many active duty men and women assigned to one of several military bases in Louisiana. But contrary to what some might believe about the United States Armed Forces, not all of the people serving are U.S. citizens. Immigrants can not only serve in the military, but their service can also set them on a path toward citizenship. Unfortunately, some service members say that the Department of Defense is restricting -- and even blocking -- that path.

Getting proof of your US citizenship

Becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States is a long and hard journey. Actually getting that U.S. citizenship usually feels like a conclusive end to things, but a lot of people overlook something very important -- actually getting proof. Naturalized citizens who are living in Louisiana should be sure that they have at least one form of proof. Although it might seem unnecessary, being prepared for potential problems in the future is essential.

Revisions are coming to the U.S. citizenship test

There are many steps to becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States. From securing the appropriate documentation to come to the U.S. in the first place, a person must also meet the age requirement and have lived as a lawful permanent resident for five years or longer. Another step to becoming a citizen is to pass the citizenship test. Immigrants living in Louisiana who have been studying for that test should be aware that it will be revised soon.

Requirements for citizenship naturalization

There are many advantages to becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States. As a citizen, individuals can exercise various rights -- including the right to vote -- and apply for specific jobs or benefit programs in Louisiana. Those who hope to obtain U.S. citizenship should be aware that there are requirements for applying for naturalization, though. Such requirements include things like residency, age and even language ability.

Citizenship applications facing serious backlog

Coming to the United States is often the first step for immigrants who have a much greater goal in mind -- becoming a citizen. However, wait times for citizenship applications are currently much longer than they used to be. With the process taking up to two years in some areas of the U.S., some people hoping to make Louisiana their permanent home could be in for a significant waiting game.

Army vet fights for daughter's citizenship

Louisiana families who hope to grow their family through adoption often turn to international adoptions, which is sometimes a more affordable and quicker process than those available domestically. While most parents are able to easily obtain citizenship for their children, it can be a bit trickier when it comes to older children. A retired Army officer and his wife are still trying to get their daughter's citizenship approved years after the adoption process was finalized. 

US government to give $10 million in citizenship grants

Becoming a citizen is a monumental achievement for Louisiana immigrants. However, it is not always an easy path, and many find they are met with unexpected hurdles. The U.S. government recently announced that it will spend as much as $10 million to make the process a little smoother for immigrants hoping to obtain citizenship.

Will a citizenship question appear on the next census?

The 2020 U.S. census is set to ask respondents whether they are citizens. This move has many people in Louisiana worried, with some wondering if their responses could jeopardize their status in the country. However, activists are fighting back against the citizenship question, with at least one federal lawsuit moving forward.